PRIVATE INVESTIGATORS

Privé-detective europe
Prive-detective europe
Privé detective europe
Prive detective europe
Privé dedective europe
Prive dedective europe
Private investigatorS europe
Private detective europe
Detective europe
Dedective europe
Investigator europe

Privé-detective
Prive-detective
Privé detective
Prive detective
Privé dedective
Prive dedective
Private investigator
Private detective
Detective
Dedective
Investigator

Privé-detective brussel
Prive-detective brussel
Privé detective brussel
Prive detective brussel
Privé dedective brussels

PRIVATE INVESTIGATORS

Information Commissioner Christopher Graham also rejected suggestions he should investigate companies that provide newspapers with personal information, because there was no indication they were acting unlawfully.

His predecessor Richard Thomas released two reports in 2006 which highlighted the scale of the trade in private data by a private investigator used by the media.

They revealed that newspapers and magazines made hundreds of requests to private detective Steve Whittamore, who was convicted of illegally accessing data in April 2005.

PRIVATE INVESTIGATORS

A private investigator (often abbreviated to PI), private detective or (informally) private eye, is a person who can be hired by individuals or groups to undertake investigatory law services. Private detectives/investigators often work for attorneys in civil cases. Many work for insurance companies to investigate suspicious claims. Before the advent of no-fault divorce, many private investigators were hired to search out evidence of adultery or other conduct within marriage to establish grounds for a divorce.

PRIVATE INVESTIGATORS

A private investigator (often abbreviated to PI), private detective or (informally) private eye, is a person who can be hired by individuals or groups to undertake investigatory law services. Private detectives/investigators often work for attorneys in civil cases. Many work for insurance companies to investigate suspicious claims. Before the advent of no-fault divorce, many private investigators were hired to search out evidence of adultery or other conduct within marriage to establish grounds for a divorce.

DUE DILIGENCE

Origin of the term "due diligence"

The term "due diligence" first came into common use as a result of the United States' Securities Act of 1933.
This Act included a defence at Sec. 11, referred to as the "Due Diligence" defence, which could be used by broker-dealers when accused of inadequate disclosure to investors of material information with respect to the purchase of securities.

DUE DILIGENCE

The term "due diligence" first came into common use as a result of the United States' Securities Act of 1933.
This Act included a defence at Sec. 11, referred to as the "Due Diligence" defence, which could be used by broker-dealers when accused of inadequate disclosure to investors of material information with respect to the purchase of securities.

EMPLOYMENT FRAUD

Employment fraud

Employment fraud, or occupational Fraud, is the scamming of people seeking or performing employment, giving them the false hope of earning wages of which they are often desperately in need. There are numerous methods that perpetrators of such schemes use to lure victims. These include promises such as easy hire, easy work, high wages for unskilled labor, flexible hours, a small number of hours paired with a lot of free time, or other attractive offers.
[edit]Types of Employment Fraud

JOB FRAUD

Job fraud

Job fraud refers to fraudulent or deceptive activity or representation on the part of an employee or prospective employee toward an employer. It is not to be confused with employment fraud, where an employer scams job seekers or fails to pay wages for work performed. There are several types of job frauds that employees or potential employees commit against employers. While some may be illegal under jurisdictional laws, others do not violate law but may be held by the employer against the employee or applicant.
Contents [hide]
1 Résumé fraud
1.1 Trends
1.2 Effects

FALSIFYING DOCUMENTS

When Ethics have Failed: Falsifying Documents in the Workplace
These days, it sometimes feels as though everywhere we look, there is another example of unethical behavior such as falsifying documents. Unfortunately, unethical and even, on occasion, illegal activity is becoming increasingly common in today’s workplace. Perhaps even worse is the fact that we are all victims when even one person is falsifying documents or performing some other unethical activity, because in the end, it does indeed hit us all in the wallet.

CORPORATE FRAUD

When the newspapers are continuously reporting corporate scandals and fraud, it is staggering to realize how common corporate fraud has truly become. Companies are now finding it vital to their continued success to implement measures of protecting themselves against corporate fraud. In fact, it is not at all unheard of for teams of representatives from different companies to be sent to courses that will equip the company with the latest techniques for detecting and handling corporate fraud within their own walls.